international translation day

The International Translation Day.

Today, on September 30, would like to take my article on the blog of Translation Company to commemorate a day very special for all of us, for our company, for my coworkers, for students of translation, which translated, literally, by love for the art and for more people, since today is the International translation day.

This celebration comes promoted since 1953, year in which was founded in Paris the International Federation of translators. The reason for choosing this date was the death of Jerónimo de Estridón, Holy who translated the Bible from Greek classical and Hebrew into Latin, which represented a revolutionary for the time Act since the Holy Scriptures, until then, had never translated into any other language. This translation is known as the Editio Vulgata, i.e. the editing for the people.

The Importance of Translation

Why is so important translation coming up to have a day in the calendar it? To be able to give an explanation, we will emphasize the title that was baptized the Bible translated into Latin, “Editing for the people”, because as we can see, the Holy with his literary work did what any translation today aims, that is, the dissemination of information to all over the world. This objective, is not at all easy to get. The quality of the translation makes the factor of greatest importance, in this way the translator must have the same dedication and affection for his work that the author of the original text. Translations depend on many fields of our environment, economy, policy, and the free movement of persons, cultural diffusion, or leisure, among others. Thus, thanks to translation products are exported from the Spanish market, we can understand the hearings of Angela Merkel or François Hollande and even all over the world can enjoy films departures from Hollywood or various Nintendo video game.

At Translation Company, we are aware of the important thing is the quality of a translation and ourselves, therefore our translations carefully. We have a staff of translators who are highly qualified and trained to perform this transfer of information from a source to a target language. Also, in our company we have instruments in order to document us and facilitate the process of translation, CAT tools such as various manuals. It is not less important, to mention that we have a team of reviewers responsible for the quality of the translations to reach its greatest exponent. Not of less importance, it is to remember that all of our workers are sworn translators duly appointed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Ultimately, is largely justified to the translation, motor Translation Company and the whole world, to have his own day, since in our polyglot world, is translating what unites us, what moves our environment and of course, this translation has its own name: the translation of quality in all caps.

How translation is helping to save endangered languages

There are roughly 7,000 spoken languages in the world today. However, it is thought that over half of them could disappear by the end of the 21st century. Every two weeks, the last living speaker of a language dies. One example is Hazel Sampson, who passed away earlier this year as the last native speaker of the S’klallam language, spoken by the Klallam Native American tribe.

Globalisation is another cause of language extinction

The cultural and economic dominance of the Western world means that English is now the ‘lingua franca’ and English language books, films and television and be found in virtually every corner of the globe. Furthermore, minority languages are being replaced by more widely spoken, global languages such as English, Spanish, Hindi and Russian.

Recognising the need to save languages from extinction, linguists are now documenting disappearing languages through translation in order to preserve them for the future. For instance, the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages records rare languages and assists communities in maintaining and revitalizing knowledge of their native languages. The Living Tongues organization records audio, visual and text documents using digital video, voice recorders, and other modern technologies. It also produces storybooks, dictionaries, online resources and multi-media educational materials to not only preserve languages for future studies, but to help members of these threatened cultures to conserve part of their heritage and learn the language of their ancestors.

Why is language preservation so important?

The death of a language also means the death of a culture. Many endangered languages express the rich cultures of the people who speak them, with stories and songs passed on to younger generations, but they have no written forms. Therefore, with the extinction of a language, an entire culture is lost. Also, studying various languages also increases our understanding of how humans communicate and store knowledge. This linguistic information can provide insight into dyslexia, language impairments, hearing loss and may help with diseases such as Alzheimer’s. If there are only a handful of languages to study, then there is not enough data to understand how language really works in the brain.

One of the projects of the Living Tongues Institute is the Chipaya Language Project in Bolivia. Chipaya is a language spoken by around 1,500 people in the highlands of Bolivia. Chipaya speakers are undergoing a shift to Spanish. The Living Tongue’s linguists travelled to Bolivia to work with some of the remaining speakers of Chipaya to record sample lexical and grammatical materials. As a result they have created a ‘Talking Dictionary’ that gives listeners a chance to hear a completely unknown language.

Furthermore, this year Living Tongues has launched a partnership with Viki, a popular video streaming site with TV shows and films from around the world. Viki uses crowd sourcing to translate subtitles for films and TV shows into a variety of different languages. The objective of the collaboration is to encourage speakers of endangered languages to translate subtitles. By doing so, they help build a record of the languages and keep them relevant for younger speakers. So far, content on Viki has been translated into 29 endangered or threatened languages, such as Zo, Nauruan, Scottish Gaelic, Cornish, and Cherokee.

All in all, translation of endangered languages, especially those only spoken, is crucial in helping preserve these languages. With translation and technology, a language that perhaps has never been heard before outside of a small town in Bolivia can suddenly have a global audience. The approach can also help to revitalize previously extinct languages, such as Cornish in the United Kingdom. By combining translation with modern technology and the Internet, the effort to conserve languages is incredibly powerful.